Tag Archives: Xperia

Sony Xperia P – The classy "Iphone" like Droid


The Xperia P  was hidden behind its flagship sister phone the Xperia S, but unusually for a phone that is supposedly a mid tier phone it has many features that’s puts it higher model to shame. Sony seems to have tried some features that they want to feature in their next range of phones with the Xperia P. Matching all the features of its flagship phone including built-in NFC it ALSO features Sony’s next gen White Magic display and aluminum uni-body construction not found in the flagship phones of 2012!

The Xperia P  in many ways is like a budget IPhone 5, sharing the same 4″ screen size and similar material on construction and camera. However on the hardware side the CPU and GPU are no match for the ultra powerful IPhone 5.

Appearance

The aluminum uni-body construction is unique and very nice to touch. Unlike the feel of a plastic body phone you really feel you are holding something cool (and it feels cool under normal conditions). However the drawback is that the phone is heavier than most 4″ phones but in no way is it too heavy!  Practically all reviews will confirm that most wish the Xperia S had been designed like the Xperia P it would have simply blow the Samsung phones out purely on quality terms!.

xperia-p

The design has the Xperia 2012 look with the removable bottom strip, supposedly if you want to change the colors and the see touch buttons. However the removable bottom strip (you can change it with optional color units, not many would actually do that is my opinion)  impacts the handling of the phone and also makes the phone large than it should be, and it certainly would have been better without it. The phone also has a thick bezel which makes the phone larger than what it should be.

  Sony_Xperia_P_buttons

Hardware

Sony sadly continued its one step behind Samsung/LG/HTC on hardware with most of their line-up and the Xperia P shares the same issue. While it has a dual-core unit, and a Mali-400M GPU, sadly its not in the same league as the far older Galaxy S2 in both processing and graphics power. The processor the Nova-Thor 1Ghz unit definitely is superior to the single-core Sony models of 2011, but still slower than the 2011 Galaxy SII though featuring the same GPU, it seems the GPU is either clocked less, or has less cores as the graphics capability seems to be around 60% of what the S2 does.

However this does not mean the Xperia P is sloth! the Nova-Thor is still quite a powerful unit, and the Mali-400 fast enough for applications and gaming, but its not going to match the capabilities of most newer units such as the Tegra3, Snapdragon S3 and S4 units found on rival phones.

One important spec of the Xperia P compared to all other Xperia phones of 2012 bar the flagship units of 2012, is that it features 1GB of memory, while all the rest (Xperia U, Go, Sola, etc) all feature 512MB. The extra memory will definitely help in general use, gaming, and will surely be appreciated with ICS (and Jelly Bean hopefully!).

Screen

The Xperia P currently brags on being one the brightest in terms of whiteness, and industry tests have shown it is the case. Sony calls this the White Magic screen, and surprisingly this is not featured in the 2012 flagship the Xperia S, and nor with the newer Acro S and Ion phones. It is said the 2013 range coming soon will feature this screen as standard, so the Xperia P is thus the only 2012 phone to feature this screen. White Magic is also a leading technology that Sony, Hitachi and Toshiba are using for the high resolution screens of the future as a means to reduce power and increase brightness.

The screen is sharp and clear, and works quite well outdoors and is stunning indoors. You definitely don’t need to enable white magic or full brightness indoors, but will need this extra brightness outdoor.

The Xperia P features a resolution that is slightly above the usual 848×480 that most are familiar with Sony phones of 2011. While not quite the 1280×720 that the Xperia S boasts, the resolution of 960×540 (similar to the 2011 HTC phones) seems good enough for a 4″ screen with a pixel density of 275.

Sounds

The Xperia P has Sony’s software enhancement of the Xloud, but compared to the 2011 models the loudspeaker seems to be less powerful and the P is no match for the Sony Arc or Arc S on this area.

However the loudspeaker quality is good and compared many phones and loud enough. The quality of the audio on the speaker is very good and so is the output when connected via a headset. However even with Xloud enabled and phone set to club mode, the audio does not have the oomph to knock your ears out as is the case with the HTC One X that I use.

Storage

Sony sometimes puzzles me, the phone definitely by design should have been able to contain an Micro SD card since smaller phones in the range featuring the identical processor (hint the sony Sola) has one. However the designers skipped this, and decided to have fancy SIM insertion mechanism and the “highly useful” HDMI connection.

So while 16GB of faster than normal internal memory is included, the lack of a micro SD to me is serious omission by Sony. Its not just the expansion in storage, but the flexibility and freedom to transfer files offered additionally by the microSD slot is something many owners of Android devices are keen on, and something that the Apple iPhone community has always missed out on.

Interface

The Xperia P initially launched with Sony’s highly optimized 2.3.x gingerbread firmware, and though many shouted out for an ICS version, the ICS version only got released very recently, months after the flagship Xperia S received the update. However Sony owners of 2011 and 2012 phones will confirm the ICS build by Sony sadly is not very stable with issues ranging from phone restarts, call drops, poor performance, etc.

The Xperia P ICS build has seen many regular updates, and while it has got more stable the phone does have an occasional restart and the call drop issue is only visible on low signal areas, a remarkable improvement compared to the many other Sony phones with ICS.

The interface does not have much tweaks though has a few touches that make it not the same as native look and feel, but is not customized anywhere close Samsung, HTC or LG. This definitely helps keep the phone nippy in usage.

The latest ICS mild tweaks can make things a bit different for users, as pressing the options menu does not bring the menu but shows “Add to Home Screen” menu which allows you to add shortcuts, widgets, bookmarks, etc to the home screen.

Camera

The Xperia P boasts the same camera featuring Sony’s EXMOR R CMOS sensor as the Xperia S, with the only change being 8MP as opposed to the Xperia S 12MP, which I think is a good thing. Something tells me that Sony pulled the IPhone 5 camera trick with the 2012 Xperia higher end model cameras and that the Xperia P maybe having the same camera unit as the Arc S/Arc of 2011 with software tweaks doing any improvement on the picture quality.

The camera does well but just like the 2011 models pictures taken indoors under low light have a lot of noise even with the flash on. Pictures taken outdoors under good light of course are excellent.

The phone also has a physical hardware shutter key to launch the camera app, in addition to a fast menu option when unlocking the phone (which can be configured via the camera app to either launch or launch and shoot, etc), so Sony’s focus on camera tweaks are very much evident in this phone. The camera app loads quickly and is ready to shoot your photo.

The camera app has had a few tweaks and includes some cool features such as 3D sweep panorama and 3D sweep multi angle and sweep panorama which are Sony specific. In addition the app also have smile detection.

Battery

The phone comes with a 1305mAh battery but this has been one decision by Sony i can’t quite agree. Sony engineers were able to package in a 1500mAh battery into the smaller, leaner Sony Xperia Ray phone last year, and yet in a phone much larger, they packaged a smaller capacity battery.

This would have been “fine” if the device consumed less battery but with a large high resolution screen and a more powerful CPU and GPU. Though featuring the supposedly thrifty White Magic display, the phone for normal users who use the phone purely for telephony without much browsing, etc the phone can last 3+ days. However enable data (3G) or WIFI, and start using the screen as it should be, and you would struggle to see over a day of use in a single charge.

Benchmarks

I keep this for last since benchmarks are good to compare but the actual performances in real life varies from benchmarks. However benchmarks help identify the strong points and weak points of phones but should never be the only reason to buy a phone!

@todo

Conclusion

The Xperia P is what you call a phone you like to have, and so much so I sold the original unit I tried (with 2.3.x) and later on got another for my wife since the phone definitely is classy and cool to have.

The phone has many things going right, with a cool classy look, decent processing power, a good screen and good camera and audio.

However Sony could have given it micro SD slot, a more powerful GPU and specially a larger capacity battery that would have made this phone a sales hit specially with the classy silver and red versions.

Regardless of its shortcomings to me the Xperia P goes as a phone that should actually have got a lot more attention, but sadly shadowed by the far more heavily marked Xperia S. For most skimping on the $ and opting for the Xperia P would have been more than good enough since the build quality of the Xperia P alone is something that the flagship is lacking.

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Sony Arc vs Sony Arc S, the battle of the former Sony flagship phones


One my office mates purchased an Xperia Arc S recently as it was offered at a very attractive price by a Telco.  The phone was still running Gingerbread, as the ICS update has not yet rolled out to this region.

However I warned the chap not to update since he had got hooked to Angry Birds, and with the ICS update this game is not working on either the Arc or the Arc S, the problem being the touch controls not working on this game.

Usage impressions

One very apparent impression is that compared to the Sony Arc, the phone seems a lot more faster due to the faster processor which definitely makes the phone a lot more usable.  Other than this obvious but very important improvement the rest is very much the same, though the battery drain also seems to be greater than the Arc which I think is attributed to the faster processor, while the battery is the same as the Arc.

Sad that Sony Ericsson (Sony) did not boost the memory to 1GB on this version, since this would have made it a lot more future proof when running ICS.

Benchmarks

Since the phones are near identical I am just including a comparison with the Sony Arc, and the benchmark shots.  The 3D performance has a remarkable gain on ICS, so the Nenamark 2 results are not a true comparison.

Arc S (LT18i) Arc (LT15)
OS Android 2.3.4 Android 4.0.4
Quadrant 1364 1257
Antutu 2.8.2 3628 2953
Nenamark 2 15 24.1

Sony Arc LT15 official ICS (Android 4.0.4) impressions


Sony had started rolling out the updates for the Sony Arc and the rest of the range that came during that period.  The good news is that the version uses the new build of Google ICS (4.0.4) which will be also be rolled out for the Arc S in due course.  So while the official update for the Arc is later than the Arc S, seems like it’s the better of the two updates!

Initially I updated my LT15 Arc with the official release for the Arc S (see impression blog at https://rayazmuthalif.wordpress.com/2012/05/02/sony-xperia-arc-ics-initial-impressions/).  While there were many good points, I felt that it had slowed down my phone though the scrolling and swipes were smoother.  Forums and reviews had loads of people complaining on the performance issues with 4.0.3 which Sony seems to have pushed quickly without sufficient tweaking and testing.  Several customers had even stepped down back to Gingerbread because of this laggy performance when using many apps.

So when I saw the new update I jumped and updated using Flashtool since the update for the Sony Arc is still not available for my region.

WOW, what a difference the 4.0.4 makes.  The interface is back to its nippy behavior with Gingerbread, with the smoother scrolling of ICS, cool J

  1. Interface is smooth, but can get laggy – SORTED, now the lag has all but gone, definitely much more optimized than before
  2. I sometime get the error saying the desktop (explorer) has stopped, or some app as stop, but if you select the wait option usually things get back into control.  I feel that the memory getting low also maybe a cause for this. – Not seen this issue with 4.04., good news J
  3. Fluffy (angry) birds (what i just tested was Rio) game does not work, though it gets launched i can’t touch and select any options, not sure how many other games and apps will have this problem.  – Angry Birds Rio, and Space both still have this problem, but World of Goo works fine.
  4. The camera takes ages to load compared to how it was with Gingerbread.  I have resorted to using CameraFX due to this, which works fine – The camera app now loads in around 2 secs (fast!) and works well.
  5. Overall app launch is a tad slower than what it was on gingerbread – No more, apps are launched as fast as the gingerbread version.
  6. Benchmarks – A bit better than the 4.0.3 here, so some tweaking has been done.
  7. The standard Music app crashes – Not seen this with the new update
  8. The time to make the initial connection and page load up times are slow , and this is also noticed when navigating within Google Play Store – Sorted, things are quick and nippy, nice

Kudos to the Sony team to making the new 4.0.4 version better optimized and stable, though why Angry Birds games does not work is a worry, and if the same will apply for any other games is a concern.

Here is a quick comparison of some tests.  The overall usability improved is noticed on the tests, but the impact on the graphical side is also noticed !

  4.0.3 (from Arc S) 4.0.4 (official for Arc)
Quadrant 1130 1257
Antutu 2.7.3 2834 (v 2.7.3) 2953 (v 2.8.2)
Nenamark 2 25.6 (v 2.2) 24.1 (v 2.2)

In case you want to do the manual update for your arc, here is a very good write-up that provides the process and the links to download the firmware and tools.  Be warned the process has to be done properly if not you will brick your phone, and by the likes of the forum several have, so it’s your decisions to take the risk!

UPDATE: Sorry missed providing the link, here is the link where you can find the download (links to the rest of the Xperia range is also available) – http://talk.sonymobile.com/thread/38251

There is a nice thread going which seems to have started off for the ARC S (LT18i) but seems relevant for other Xperia 2011 phones. Read the articles from the end as the initial ones are for the very buggy 4.0.3 update.  http://talk.sonymobile.com/thread/35431?start=135&tstart=0

Sony Xperia Arc (s) ICS 4.0.3 initial impressions


[UPDATE: I have replaced the Arc S 4.0.3 firmware with the official 4.0.4 update for the Sony Arc, the difference between the two versions are immense, please see my new post on that to get the real ICS impressions for the Sony Arc]

Sony Ericsson, who are now simply Sony once again have worked very hard to rebuild their bad reputation over software updates issues they had with their 2009/2010 phones.  With the Sony Arc and the new models they have done a job that has been even better than Samsung, which has reflected well in the higher sales of they very cool looking mobile devices.

Sony for some reason has always been one step behind on the hardware side compared to leading competitors like Samsung, HTC, etc but have managed to counter with excellent design, great multimedia and most importantly well optimized software that ensured you did not feel the hardware was lacking.

However with ICS, they seem to have faced the challenge and they had to delay the original roll out plan.  The much awaited ICS updated for the Arc and newer phones were due in April was delayed, and now only the newer Arc S and the Neo V and Ray got the update, while the older models only getting June or later.

However the Arc and the Arc S are from a hardware point pretty much identical, with the key difference being the higher clock processor (overclocked possibly, since the processor definitely can be pushed beyond the 1Ghz speed) on the Arc S.  Even the battery is the same which is why the Arc S has less standby time than the Arc.

I did not want try a custom ROM on my phone, since i like my main phone to be “available” and hence experiments were controlled.  However I was keen to see if ICS would improve things , and thanks to Xperiablog.net (http://www.xperiablog.net/2012/04/15/install-official-android-4-0-ics-update-to-your-xperia-arc-guide/) i went and flashed it with the nordic ICS firmware for the Arc S which they had found works perfectly fine with the Arc 🙂

Tips when flashing

Word of warning if you look at that article in Xperiablog.net you will see a lot of people have bricked their phones, so follow the instructions carefully.

1. Backup your device using App Backup & Restore, do not that this App does not back all apps, so as a secondary option also use the Google backup option for apps.

2.  The update went smoothly but i had faced one twist when trying get the phone recognized.  This is what i did,

  • The flashtool continued to report that drivers were missing, though i had updated the PC companion to the latest and tested that the phone was being detected.
  • I then installed the drivers from the flash tool, and faced the same issue, but then found that you also have to check “Flashmode drivers” when installing the drivers in addition to the arc drivers.  Once i did this the detection when smooth and the update completed

Once i had flashed the application the only issue was i had a free upgrade.  In my about the device is now listed as an LT18i :), no sadly the processor does not get  overclocked to 1.4Ghz like the Arc for that you need to root and see how much you can push your CPU.  I am not trying that on my everyday phone!  I can live with that until the Arc specific firmware will come, by which time i am sure Sony would have optimized the ICS build further and fixed any defects.

I have now been using the phone for over a week, and these were some observations, some I believe will also be applicable for Arc S users since ICS is a bit of resource hog and seems to have been designed with higher memory, graphics and multi-core capabilities in mind.

  1. Interface is smooth, but can get laggy, the reason i found is that the memory usage is higher on ICS, so you have to keep an eye and close apps to ensure you have enough to keep the phone going smooth.  I have just 1-2 small widgets running, and just having these and the email, FB and gmail apps brings the memory down to just 36MB remaining.  Below is the memory usage with most apps closed and just the OS, and standard apps running.
  2. I sometime get the error saying the desktop (explorer) has stopped, or some app as stop, but if you select the wait option usually things get back into control.  I feel that the memory getting low also maybe a cause for this.
  3. Fluffy (angry) birds (what i just tested was Rio) game does not work, though it gets launched i can’t touch and select any options, not sure how many other games and apps will have this problem.  Since Rio worked fine on my MediaPad and Acer A500 devices, this is definitely an issue with the Sony ICS build.
  4. The camera takes ages to load compared to how it was with Gingerbread.  I have resorted to using CameraFX due to this, which works fine
  5. Overall app launch is a tad slower than what it was on gingerbread
  6. Benchmarks indicate no significant change in performance, though i was expecting much better performance :(
  7. Make sure the face book app is closed when not needed, as that can hog your system.
  8. Media Go sync seems to have problems and seems to freeze when sync’ing your photos and videos
  9. The standard Music app crashes

Key areas i saw improvements

1. The overall touch and swipe actions are lot smoother

2. The standard keyboard for the first time is actually pretty decent, even though its not as intelligent as SwiftKey X.

3. Browser seems more nippy

4. Video playback seems more smoother

5. The ICS feature on how you can close the app (swipe right after selecting the home button) is cool and easy (wish Windows 8 consumer edition had this feature)

I saw on a recent blog that a more newer firmware was already provided some regions, so will wait and see if these fix these issues.   One thing that has changed is that Sony has now removed the custom screen capture feature they had when you pressed the power button and now use the ICS screen capture feature.  This is done by pressing the power and volume down button for around 10+ secs which takes a screen shot, takes a while to get used to but once you do its fairly effective.

Benchmarks

Did not notice any great improvements, and overall its here and there on the overall “benchmarks”.  If i recall correct performances seems to have gone down!

Here are some screen shots, immediately noticeable is the new font which makes things look a bit nicer.  I have included things that have changed in ICS or look different.

         

Sony Ericsson XPERIA X10 hands on review


Decided that it would be unfair to comment on features that are more phone oriented in the Android 2.1 review article, so here are some in relevant to the Sony Ericsson X10 phone.  How relevant they are to other Android phones needs to be based on the phone you have 🙂

Camera and multimedia

  • 8MP camera, good on mega pixel but with a weak flash indoor photographs are crap to worthless.  However the daylight photos are very good and have a lot of detail, with the only issue being in very bright light where the photos are heavily exposed and can end up with very little detail and lots of light.
  • Some overly intelligent engineer at Sony Ericsson decided not to have an option for the flash in the menu and hide it as the “Photo Flash” in the Advanced Menu.  Super intelligent and totally non-user friendly.  So if you want the flash at your fingertips, this is not the phone.  Also third party Camera software such as eCamera do not detect the flash, so some issue with the SE implementation of the camera.  The Nokia phones may overuse the flash but they at least give you blur free pics, not so with this phone, got to be lucky to get blur free indoors.  However the LED light is more a camera light / torch light, so its practically useless for shooting still photos.
  • The touch focus works super fast, but is rather slow and inaccurate for precise work, however the touch focus works beautifully for landscapes and is ideal since the hardware camera focus button is so hard to press that when you press it you get blurred photos (UPDATE: Seems the blurry photo issue is associated with Android 2.1, so not a Sony Ericsson issue but i still think the hardware button is too firm).  Forget the build in image stabilization, its pure software and crap, not seen any use for it.
  • Smile recognition is another feature, but unlike a digital camera implementation it takes a long time to lock and shoot, so only ideal with adults who will remain smiling until you tell them not too.
  • The camera features have several combinations, and Sony Ericsson developers have made life very hard that you need to work out these combinations. E.g. With smile recognition enabled the hardware button won’t work, and for macro you need to make sure you have the correct mode enabled.  Would be great if these automations were worked out by the software, rather than making the user do it.   From a software perspective we have gone back several steps compared to what we had in phones, and this coming from camera experts Sony is very dissapointing.
  • The autofocus is there alright, but its so slow, that it borders uselessness.  However eCamera focuses much faster, so its a problem with the Sony Ericsson software.
  • The video quality is pretty decent and performs decently under low light as well, much better than the still photos in low light which is very strange.

Keyboard

  • The SE default keyboard simply stated is CRAP.  The sensitivity is not great, and the error rate high compared to using with the N97.  For the people who want to text, just get a full QWERTY hardware keyboard phone in the likes of a E-series nokia or blackberry or a full keyboard Android if you want an Android based phone.  However i tried out the SwiftKey keyboard which was a marked improvement over the default keyboard, so clearly another areas where SE can just buy a third keyboard than wasting their time writing one.

Photo Gallery

Some pictures taken from the camera using the standard camera app, and other camera apps such as eCamera, FXCamera.

Taken during the day, the quality of pictures is pretty good and the metering quite decent, though the skies seems a bit overexposed.

Taken indoor in some testing light condition, flash photo light switched off. Quite surprised that the output has been good.  However this only applies only to fixed landscapes, any moving objects come out blurred and smudged.

Again when the light conditions are favorable the pictures turn out pretty good for a phone camera.

Taken indoors under weak florescent lighting.  Flash / Photo light was not activated (though doubt if that would have done any difference).  Look decent but you can see the picture is very noisy.

Syncing up your contacts from a Nokia phone to an Android


Unless your phones PC connectivity solution comes with this capability (Sony Ericsson’s software does not as as Jan 2011), you have a long and rather complex option. However the Android Market has software that can do this, but they are not free.

  1. Save the outlook contacts as a CSV.  Problem, outlook cannot do that, and I had to track down a tool that worked as an outlook add-on but was very low on usability (You have to select each field you need).
  2. You then need to go to gmail and import the contacts
  3. Then you need sync the contacts from gmail to your phone
  4. However there is a bug, that some of the contacts have wrong phone no’s.  However the CSV file has the correct no’s, so problems with the google import process 🙂

UPDATE: Not a bug but google mail contact importer does not support all fields in outlook, and also expects the names of the columns to match its. The best way is to create a sample contact in google and export it to get the format!   Read http://mail.google.com/support/bin/answer.py?answer=12119andhttp://mail.google.com/support/bin/answer.py?answer=14024&hl=en to get more context.

From Symbian to Android – my experiences


Afters years of Nokia Symbian ownership decided i need to try out one of the more popular smartphone platforms.  If the Nokia N8 did not have the hardware failure, I was also set in purchasing it, since the legacy feel of Symbian3, weak app market (ovi) were not big issues, though the lower resolution screen was a bit of bummer.  The C7 is a decent lower model, but the full-focusing camera makes it not good since the ability for a camera in the phone to take picture of a whiteboard or a receipt is vital. Full focus while doing a good job with normal pics, can only focus beyond 50cm, so that means no macro at all.

While the IPhone 4 is a very appealing proposition, specially with the rich app store, the bordering arrogance (putting it mildly) of Apple on how they handle their sales put me off.   I also found from the official local agent for Apple that Apple has prohibited selling the IPhone in my country, and this is something i have not seen with any other vendor.  So off went the Apple IPhone no matter how good!

So then the option was to get into the more wilder Android market.  The Galaxy S was the choice, but with budgets, i took the Sony Ericsson X10 (yeah yeah, support is crap, no proper multi-touch, Froyo aint’  coming here……………………..) as the replacement for the Nokia N97 mini.

First impressions,

PROS

– The app store is definitely richer

– The apps are far more smoother than the N97mini. Then again this is running a processor that 2.5X of the N97 mini and has a dedicated graphic card, so i guess that not a fair comparison

– The higher no of pixels are definitely useful, as you see the difference when browsing and reading content such as pdfs, etc. Definitely a worthy improvement

– The multiple desktops, definitely helps customize the apps into groups, and the lack of restrictions on the size of the widget makes it even more neater

CONS

– Outlook sync:: NO OUTLOOK sync.  This really surprised me. Here i have synced my contacts with outlook, and were all ready to sync to find that i cannot.  The work around was messy and complex, unless you buy a commercial tool.  This is how i got around it without any special tool, but its a manual process based on reading the net and then doing some of my own experiments.  See  https://rayazmuthalif.wordpress.com/2011/01/23/syncing-up-your-contacts-from-a-nokia-phone-to-an-android/.  Quite surprising considering google must be having loads of users converting from nokia and and other phones and no having a Google tool for this is ridiculous.

– Tethering:: No built in tethering, i mean sure it supports it but its all via downloads from the market.  Things that Nokia gave free are sadly not bundled.  The sync app is super featureless, with only media transfers, and a file manager.  No wonder manufacturers love Android, their costs are  lowered in the investment on apps.

–  User Experience:: Maybe its the SE implementation but the touch interface is not smooth, i have tried the iPhone and this is no match for the iOS interface (yet).

– Usability:: who said Symbian was bad.  Just try going through the menu options on Android.  It is no good either.  Stevey J and the boys definitely have that end covered. My wife who had a time learning to use the N97MINI, simply used this and said, only for the techies, as its just to overly complex for a phone.  Can’t disagree with her on that, this is more like a desktop OS than a phone OS.

– Multimedia:: Woo.. seems like the video codec we took for granted is not available as yet for Android phones.  The Galaxy S is the first certified DIVX supported phone, which means none of the other phones have official divx support.  Add to it there is no Divx software for Androids as yet.  Seems the current Divx implementations are all software based, so expect heavy battery drain when playing Divx

– Camera:: Have you noticed that most Android camera’s have no proper flash.  The much famed Galaxy S for instance does not even have any sort of flash.  However don’ t think its because they use any great sensor, the Nokia N8 sensor rules in this arena.  The current camera capabilities are limited in Android, with very little control.  Most of what you see in the camera apps is thanks to the manufacturer, not Google Android.

– Free Apps drain power and increase data costs due to Ad download:: Apps are free on on the google app market, BUT.. a big BUT, most of them require internet connectivity to work, since they need to download ads.  This could be a no no for many users in our market since unless you buy a data package bundle you can end up with big bills.  So watch out.